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van Eyk Research, which is about to celebrate its 20th birthday, is looking to restructure to take advantage of opportunities from the raft of possible regulatory changes heading the way of the financial planning market. Mark Thomas, the chief executive, says there are several structural changes to the industry likely to flow from the three main inquiries currently underway – the Ripoll inquiry into commissions, the Cooper inquiry into superannuation, and the Henry inquiry into tax. One of the main effects is likely to be a back-to-the-future move by large institutions to tied distribution, leaving the independent sector of the planning market to seek out partners and “virtual” support to allow for a vertically integrated client offering.


“If we can provide a service which includes research, product, compliance and licensing, and maybe insurance, it will help our clients avoid the risks of the new environment,” Thomas said in an interview coinciding with the firm’s 20th birthday celebrations. Thomas and co-directors, Darren Pettiona and acting chair Cameron McCullagh, have been looking at a new capital structure for the firm to cement its future, which is likely to include at least a new shareholder to replace Stephen van Eyk and perhaps the ability to raise new capital. “The main challenge for me is to put in place a structure which enables us to lock in staff and allow us all to reap the rewards of our work,” Thomas said. “We may be able to offer planners the ability to become shareholders or partners where they want to be a part of an independent platform…


We haven’t yet untapped the value of the van Eyk brand.” Stephen van Eyk, along with independents Sarah Brennan and Stephen Roberts, recently stepped down as a director of the firm he cofounded with James Purvis in October 1989, which was just a few months before Thomas joined, in March 1990, as an analyst initially to do a global equities review. After the many ups, and a few downs, of the subsequent 20 years, van Eyk, the man, will phase himself out by doing some consulting work for the firm until next March. He says he does not yet know what he will do after that. In that 20 years Stephen van Eyk became the premier adviser to the financial planning market. Notable for telling everyone and everything exactly how he saw it, van Eyk was, and is, widely loved by financial planners across the country. Thomas said:


“We can never try to replace Stephen as an individual. He’s an enigma. But he would be the first to admit that a lot of his ideas came out of our research team.” The firm is currently undertaking another strategic business review, with input from most of the staff. The contribution from the research staff, headed by Nigel Douglas, includes common themes such as: ‘emphasis on process rather than individual initiative’, ‘not allowing business interests to override research’ and ‘no payment for ratings’. more staff would be able to join the ranks of the company’s 20-odd shareholders. Key moments in the firm’s history have included: . Purvis van Eyk formed in October 1989, joined by Mark Thomas in March 1990 . a management buyout in 1995 of James Purvis, who went on to be an early master trust provider with United Funds Management, and the launch of the van Eyk Research name .

the exit of ipac from generally provided research and the introduction of its core client HillRoss to van Eyk in 1996 . the development of a desktop research platform, iRate, in 1998 . the launch of www.irate. vaneyk.com in 2001 . the launch of the Blueprint multi-manager series in 2003 . the listing of the Three Pillars investment company in 2004, for which van Eyk recently lost the management rights after a proxy battle with the Dixons dealer group . the launch of Blueprint Alternatives in 2005 . the launch of Blueprint Alternatives Plus, a feeder fund with daily liquidity, in 2006 . a major revamp of Blueprint in 2008 leading to the launch of five new mega sector funds. . the introduction in 2009 of two new sector funds for Blueprint – absolute Australian equities and (next month) absolute global equities. Blueprint, for which Macquarie Bank is the responsible entity, has about $1.4 billion under management.

In the last five years, competition from other researchers came at van Eyk “in a huge way”, Thomas said, but the firm had maintained a market share of more than 50 per cent of planners for a long time. The latest survey, by IFA magazine, in the year to June 2009, showed van Eyk provided research to 53 per cent of the top 100 dealer groups. van Eyk clients which are not owned by institutions make up 67 per cent of van Eyk’s client base by number of planners or 83 per cent by number of planning practices. “The independent planners have always been our heartland,” Thomas said. “And a lot of them won’t want to become part of a bank just because of the regulatory changes. It’s in our interests and their interests to help them get the support they need for the changed conditions ahead.” While the outcome form the Government and parliamentary inquiries is not yet known, it is clear that the world will get greater transparency and fewer obvious conflicts within the financial advisory market. Both the FPA and IFSA have new protocols to phase out commissions, which will have widespread ramifications throughout the industry. Thomas believes that the payment by managers of shelf space fees on platforms will also likely be phased out, either because of market or regulatory pressure.

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van Eyk Research, which is about to celebrate its 20th birthday, is looking to restructure to take advantage of opportunities from the raft of possible regulatory changes heading the way of the financial planning market. Mark Thomas, the chief executive, says there are several structural changes to the industry likely to flow from the three main inquiries currently underway – the Ripoll inquiry into commissions, the Cooper inquiry into superannuation, and the Henry inquiry into tax. One of the main effects is likely to be a back-to-the-future move by large institutions to tied distribution, leaving the independent sector of the planning market to seek out partners and “virtual” support to allow for a vertically integrated client offering. “If we can provide a service which includes research, product, compliance and licensing, and maybe insurance, it will help our clients avoid the risks of the new environment,” Thomas said in an interview coinciding with the firm’s 20th birthday celebrations.

Thomas and co-directors, Darren Pettiona and acting chair Cameron McCullagh, have been looking at a new capital structure for the firm to cement its future, which is likely to include at least a new shareholder to replace Stephen van Eyk and perhaps the ability to raise new capital. “The main challenge for me is to put in place a structure which enables us to lock in staff and allow us all to reap the rewards of our work,” Thomas said. “We may be able to offer planners the ability to become shareholders or partners where they want to be a part of an independent platform… We haven’t yet untapped the value of the van Eyk brand.” Stephen van Eyk, along with independents Sarah Brennan and Stephen Roberts, recently stepped down as a director of the firm he cofounded with James Purvis in October 1989, which was just a few months before Thomas joined, in March 1990, as an analyst initially to do a global equities review. After the many ups, and a few downs, of the subsequent 20 years, van Eyk, the man, will phase himself out by doing some consulting work for the firm until next March. He says he does not yet know what he will do after that.

In that 20 years Stephen van Eyk became the premier adviser to the financial planning market. Notable for telling everyone and everything exactly how he saw it, van Eyk was, and is, widely loved by financial planners across the country. Thomas said: “We can never try to replace Stephen as an individual. He’s an enigma. But he would be the first to admit that a lot of his ideas came out of our research team.” The firm is currently undertaking another strategic business review, with input from most of the staff. The contribution from the research staff, headed by Nigel Douglas, includes common themes such as: ‘emphasis on process rather than individual initiative’, ‘not allowing business interests to override research’ and ‘no payment for ratings’. more staff would be able to join the ranks of the company’s 20-odd shareholders.

Key moments in the firm’s history have included: . Purvis van Eyk formed in October 1989, joined by Mark Thomas in March 1990 . a management buyout in 1995 of James Purvis, who went on to be an early master trust provider with United Funds Management, and the launch of the van Eyk Research name . the exit of ipac from generally provided research and the introduction of its core client HillRoss to van Eyk in 1996 . the development of a desktop research platform, iRate, in 1998 . the launch of www.irate. vaneyk.com in 2001 . the launch of the Blueprint multi-manager series in 2003 . the listing of the Three Pillars investment company in 2004, for which van Eyk recently lost the management rights after a proxy battle with the Dixons dealer group . the launch of Blueprint Alternatives in 2005 . the launch of Blueprint Alternatives Plus, a feeder fund with daily liquidity, in 2006 . a major revamp of Blueprint in 2008 leading to the launch of five new mega sector funds. . the introduction in 2009 of two new sector funds for Blueprint – absolute Australian equities and (next month) absolute global equities.

Blueprint, for which Macquarie Bank is the responsible entity, has about $1.4 billion under management. In the last five years, competition from other researchers came at van Eyk “in a huge way”, Thomas said, but the firm had maintained a market share of more than 50 per cent of planners for a long time. The latest survey, by IFA magazine, in the year to June 2009, showed van Eyk provided research to 53 per cent of the top 100 dealer groups. van Eyk clients which are not owned by institutions make up 67 per cent of van Eyk’s client base by number of planners or 83 per cent by number of planning practices. “The independent planners have always been our heartland,” Thomas said. “And a lot of them won’t want to become part of a bank just because of the regulatory changes. It’s in our interests and their interests to help them get the support they need for the changed conditions ahead.” While the outcome form the Government and parliamentary inquiries is not yet known, it is clear that the world will get greater transparency and fewer obvious conflicts within the financial advisory market. Both the FPA and IFSA have new protocols to phase out commissions, which will have widespread ramifications throughout the industry. Thomas believes that the payment by managers of shelf space fees on platforms will also likely be phased out, either because of market or regulatory pressure.

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

van Eyk Research, which is about to celebrate its 20th birthday, is looking to restructure to take advantage of opportunities from the raft of possible regulatory changes heading the way of the financial planning market. Mark Thomas, the chief executive, says there are several structural changes to the industry likely to flow from the three main inquiries currently underway – the Ripoll inquiry into commissions, the Cooper inquiry into superannuation, and the Henry inquiry into tax. One of the main effects is likely to be a back-to-the-future move by large institutions to tied distribution, leaving the independent sector of the planning market to seek out partners and “virtual” support to allow for a vertically integrated client offering. “If we can provide a service which includes research, product, compliance and licensing, and maybe insurance, it will help our clients avoid the risks of the new environment,” Thomas said in an interview coinciding with the firm’s 20th birthday celebrations. Thomas and co-directors, Darren Pettiona and acting chair Cameron McCullagh, have been looking at a new capital structure for the firm to cement its future, which is likely to include at least a new shareholder to replace Stephen van Eyk and perhaps the ability to raise new capital. “The main challenge for me is to put in place a structure which enables us to lock in staff and allow us all to reap the rewards of our work,” Thomas said. “We may be able to offer planners the ability to become shareholders or partners where they want to be a part of an independent platform… We haven’t yet untapped the value of the van Eyk brand.” Stephen van Eyk, along with independents Sarah Brennan and Stephen Roberts, recently stepped down as a director of the firm he cofounded with James Purvis in October 1989, which was just a few months before Thomas joined, in March 1990, as an analyst initially to do a global equities review. After the many ups, and a few downs, of the subsequent 20 years, van Eyk, the man, will phase himself out by doing some consulting work for the firm until next March. He says he does not yet know what he will do after that. In that 20 years Stephen van Eyk became the premier adviser to the financial planning market. Notable for telling everyone and everything exactly how he saw it, van Eyk was, and is, widely loved by financial planners across the country. Thomas said: “We can never try to replace Stephen as an individual. He’s an enigma. But he would be the first to admit that a lot of his ideas came out of our research team.” The firm is currently undertaking another strategic business review, with input from most of the staff. The contribution from the research staff, headed by Nigel Douglas, includes common themes such as: ‘emphasis on process rather than individual initiative’, ‘not allowing business interests to override research’ and ‘no payment for ratings’. more staff would be able to join the ranks of the company’s 20-odd shareholders. Key moments in the firm’s history have included: . Purvis van Eyk formed in October 1989, joined by Mark Thomas in March 1990 . a management buyout in 1995 of James Purvis, who went on to be an early master trust provider with United Funds Management, and the launch of the van Eyk Research name . the exit of ipac from generally provided research and the introduction of its core client HillRoss to van Eyk in 1996 . the development of a desktop research platform, iRate, in 1998 . the launch of www.irate. vaneyk.com in 2001 . the launch of the Blueprint multi-manager series in 2003 . the listing of the Three Pillars investment company in 2004, for which van Eyk recently lost the management rights after a proxy battle with the Dixons dealer group . the launch of Blueprint Alternatives in 2005 . the launch of Blueprint Alternatives Plus, a feeder fund with daily liquidity, in 2006 . a major revamp of Blueprint in 2008 leading to the launch of five new mega sector funds. . the introduction in 2009 of two new sector funds for Blueprint – absolute Australian equities and (next month) absolute global equities. Blueprint, for which Macquarie Bank is the responsible entity, has about $1.4 billion under management. In the last five years, competition from other researchers came at van Eyk “in a huge way”, Thomas said, but the firm had maintained a market share of more than 50 per cent of planners for a long time. The latest survey, by IFA magazine, in the year to June 2009, showed van Eyk provided research to 53 per cent of the top 100 dealer groups. van Eyk clients which are not owned by institutions make up 67 per cent of van Eyk’s client base by number of planners or 83 per cent by number of planning practices. “The independent planners have always been our heartland,” Thomas said. “And a lot of them won’t want to become part of a bank just because of the regulatory changes. It’s in our interests and their interests to help them get the support they need for the changed conditions ahead.” While the outcome form the Government and parliamentary inquiries is not yet known, it is clear that the world will get greater transparency and fewer obvious conflicts within the financial advisory market. Both the FPA and IFSA have new protocols to phase out commissions, which will have widespread ramifications throughout the industry. Thomas believes that the payment by managers of shelf space fees on platforms will also likely be phased out, either because of market or regulatory pressure.

is about to celebrate its 20th
birthday, is looking to restructure
to take advantage of
opportunities from the raft of
possible regulatory changes
heading the way of the financial
planning market.
Mark Thomas, the chief
executive, says there are several
structural changes to the industry
likely to flow from the
three main inquiries currently
underway – the Ripoll inquiry
into commissions, the Cooper
inquiry into superannuation,
and the Henry inquiry into tax.
One of the main effects is
likely to be a back-to-the-future
move by large institutions
to tied distribution, leaving
the independent sector of the
planning market to seek out
partners and “virtual” support
to allow for a vertically integrated
client offering.
“If we can provide a service
which includes research, product,
compliance and licensing,
and maybe insurance, it will
help our clients avoid the
risks of the new environment,”
Thomas said in an interview
coinciding with the firm’s 20th
birthday celebrations.
Thomas and co-directors,
Darren Pettiona and acting
chair Cameron McCullagh,
have been looking at a new
capital structure for the firm
to cement its future, which is
likely to include at least a new
shareholder to replace Stephen
van Eyk and perhaps the ability
to raise new capital.
“The main challenge for me
is to put in place a structure
which enables us to lock in
staff and allow us all to reap the
rewards of our work,” Thomas
said. “We may be able to offer
planners the ability to become
shareholders or partners where
they want to be a part of an
independent platform… We
haven’t yet untapped the value
of the van Eyk brand.”
Stephen van Eyk, along
with independents Sarah
Brennan and Stephen Roberts,
recently stepped down as a
director of the firm he cofounded
with James Purvis in
October 1989, which was just
a few months before Thomas
joined, in March 1990, as an
analyst initially to do a global
equities review.
After the many ups, and a
few downs, of the subsequent
20 years, van Eyk, the man,
will phase himself out by doing
some consulting work for the
firm until next March. He says
he does not yet know what he
will do after that.
In that 20 years Stephen
van Eyk became the premier
adviser to the financial planning
market. Notable for
telling everyone and everything
exactly how he saw it, van Eyk
was, and is, widely loved by
financial planners across the
country.
Thomas said: “We can
never try to replace Stephen as
an individual. He’s an enigma.
But he would be the first to admit
that a lot of his ideas came
out of our research team.”
The firm is currently
undertaking another strategic
business review, with input
from most of the staff. The
contribution from the research
staff, headed by Nigel Douglas,
includes common themes such
as: ‘emphasis on process rather
than individual initiative’, ‘not
allowing business interests to
override research’ and ‘no payment
for ratings’